Microsatellite marker polymorphism and mapping in pea (Pisum sativum L.)

Publication Overview
TitleMicrosatellite marker polymorphism and mapping in pea (Pisum sativum L.)
AuthorsLoridon K, McPhee K, Morin J, Dubreuil P, Pilet-Nayel ML, Aubert G, Rameau C, Baranger A, Coyne C, Lejeune-Hènaut I, Burstin J
TypeComparative Study
Volume111
Issue6
Year2005
Page(s)1022-31
CitationLoridon K, McPhee K, Morin J, Dubreuil P, Pilet-Nayel ML, Aubert G, Rameau C, Baranger A, Coyne C, Lejeune-Hènaut I, Burstin J. Microsatellite marker polymorphism and mapping in pea (Pisum sativum L.). TAG. Theoretical and applied genetics. Theoretische und angewandte Genetik. 2005 Oct; 111(6):1022-31.

Abstract

This paper aims at providing reliable and cost effective genotyping conditions, level of polymorphism in a range of genotypes and map position of newly developed microsatellite markers in order to promote broad application of these markers as a common set for genetic studies in pea. Optimal PCR conditions were determined for 340 microsatellite markers based on amplification in eight genotypes. Levels of polymorphism were determined for 309 of these markers. Compared to data obtained for other species, levels of polymorphism detected in a panel of eight genotypes were high with a mean number of 3.8 alleles per polymorphic locus and an average PIC value of 0.62, indicating that pea represents a rather polymorphic autogamous species. One of our main objectives was to locate a maximum number of microsatellite markers on the pea genetic map. Data obtained from three different crosses were used to build a composite genetic map of 1,430 cM (Haldane) comprising 239 microsatellite markers. These include 216 anonymous SSRs developed from enriched genomic libraries and 13 SSRs located in genes. The markers are quite evenly distributed throughout the seven linkage groups of the map, with 85% of intervals between the adjacent SSR markers being smaller than 10 cM. There was a good conservation of marker order and linkage group assignment across the three populations. In conclusion, we hope this report will promote wide application of these markers and will allow information obtained by different laboratories worldwide in diverse fields of pea genetics, such as QTL mapping studies and genetic resource surveys, to be easily aligned.

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Pages

Featuremaps
This publication contains information about 4 maps:
Map Name
pea-TeresexK586-RIL
pea-TeresexChampagne-RIL
pea-ShawneexBohatyr-RIL
pea-microsatComposite-2005
Properties
Additional details for this publication include:
Property NameValue
ISSN0040-5752
Journal AbbreviationTheor. Appl. Genet.
Journal CountryGermany
LanguageEnglish
Language Abbreng
pISSN0040-5752
Publication Date2005 Oct
Publication ModelPrint-Electronic
Publication TypeComparative Study
Published Location1022-31
Publication TypeJournal Article
Publication TypeResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Cross References
This publication is also available in the following databases:
DatabaseAccession
AGL: USDA National Agricultural LibraryAGL:3785301
PMID: PubMedPMID:16133320